Report A Security Change Or Concern About Others - Insider Threats


What is an Insider Threat?

An insider threat is defined as the threat that an employee, contractor or individual with access to government information, systems or facilities will use his or her authorized access, wittingly or unwittingly, to do harm to the security of the United States.

What should be reported?

For more information about what types of activities can be deemed an insider threat, please see our “Reporting an Insider Threat” brochure.

Who should you report an insider threat to?

If you are not affiliated with the government as an employee, military member or contractor and find yourself in a position where you believe you need to report an insider threat, you would contact your local law enforcement or the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

What is an Insider Threat?

An insider threat is defined as the threat that an employee, contractor or individual with access to government information, systems or facilities will use his or her authorized access, wittingly or unwittingly, to do harm to the security of the United States.

What should be reported?

For more information about what types of activities can be deemed an insider threat, please see our “Reporting an Insider Threat” brochure.

Who should you report and insider threat to?

All military, Federal or contract personnel should report potential insider threats via their Component Insider Threat Hub/Program or other designated channels such as security or human resources.

What is an Insider Threat?

An insider threat is defined as the threat that an employee, contractor or individual with access to government information, systems or facilities will use his or her authorized access, wittingly or unwittingly, to do harm to the security of the United States.

What should be reported?

For more information about what types of activities can be deemed an insider threat, please see our “Reporting an Insider Threat” brochure.

Who should you report an insider threat to?

All military, Federal or contract personnel should report potential insider threats via their Component Insider Threat Hub/Program or other designated channels such as security or human resources.

If you are an employee or contractor for DCSA, please check the Intranet Infolink for the correct insider threat reporting contact.

What is an Insider Threat?

An insider threat is defined as the threat that an employee, contractor or individual with access to government information, systems or facilities will use his or her authorized access, wittingly or unwittingly, to do harm to the security of the United States.

What should be reported?

For more information about what types of activities can be deemed an insider threat, please see our “Reporting an Insider Threat” brochure.

Who should you report an insider threat to?

DoD Contactors and other Industry members should report potential insider threats to your company’s Facility Security Officer or the Vetting Risk Operations Center (VROC) Knowledge Center:

VROC Knowledge Center
8 AM to 5 PM EST, Monday—Friday
(888) 282-7682
This Knowledge Center is closed on weekends and all federal holidays.

What is an Insider Threat?

An insider threat is defined as the threat that an employee, contractor or individual with access to government information, systems or facilities will use his or her authorized access, wittingly or unwittingly, to do harm to the security of the United States.

What should be reported?

For more information about what types of activities can be deemed an insider threat, please see our “Reporting an Insider Threat” brochure.

Who should you report an insider threat to?

Non-DoD and Non-Industry Contactors should report potential insider threats to your company’s Facility Security Officer.

Why is mitigating insider threats so important to the United States?

Insider threats can cause significant damage to our people and our national security. The U.S. federal government takes seriously the obligation to protect its people and assets whether the threats come from internal or external sources. Insider threat programs help ensure our hard-working and dedicated workforce have a safe environment to carry out our important missions.

Are all insider threats malicious or intentional?

No. An insider threat may be “unwitting” if the insider is unaware that his or her actions or behaviors are exposing the United States to an elevated risk of harm or loss, perhaps through lack of training or negligence.

I don’t work with classified information. Is my office still vulnerable to insider threats?

Yes. There is no environment immune from the potential of insider threats. Insiders can threaten not only classified information but also sensitive information that can disrupt or harm individuals, U.S. resources, infrastructure or economy.

Are insiders as dangerous as external threats?

There should be no doubt that insiders present an equal threat to that posed by external actors. Their access and familiarity with the Government’s policies, security procedures, and technologies provide insiders opportunities to do great harm.

What should be reported as an Insider Threat?

For more information about what types of activities can be deemed an insider threat, please see our “Reporting an Insider Threat” brochure.